Sidewayskiwi
1557953201380-2079395385.jpg what's the lightest paints/coverings for DTF 
Acrylic ? Spray can ?
Brand?
Share your experience
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e3_Scott
1557953201380-2079395385.jpg what's the lightest paints/coverings for DTF 
Acrylic ? Spray can ?
Brand?
Share your experience


In my experience, it depends whether you want your plane to look good a foot away or want to see it more easily 100 ft away.  Magic marker adds essentially no weight, I have "painted" several planes with markers in the past.  After that, I use acrylic craft paints diluted with a 50/50 water/alcohol mix until it is about the consistency of coffee cream and then brush it on so that I have good control over how much paint is being applied.  This doesn't always make for the best coverage when looking at the plane up close and won't win any model shows, but when it is ripping by 50+ ft away, I'm not too worried about it, I just want to be able to see my plane so I don't lose orientation.

I have only painted one plane with foam safe Testor's spray paint which was very expensive, about $6 (Cdn) for a small can and my plane ended up quite heavy as I lack the skill to properly control how much paint is being applied.

I will continue with the magic marker or diluted acrylic craft paint as in my experience it helps my planes look reasonably good, is cheap and keeps the plane light.

Cheers,

Scott
Park Jet noise...the "other" sound of freedom😎
#ParkJetnoise #ParkJetpilot
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F1wanabe
I've mentioned it before, but I believe the white of Depron or MPF is he lightest color! Use white whenever possible and accent the plane's shape with color. My eyes are pretty bad at a distance so I put color only on the top of the plane, and I only try to paint accents on it to show which direction the plane is flying. Unless I'm going for a scale look. But the F18 v4 is a good example...
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TomMonton
You've already called it. The cheap 2oz hobby craft acrylics found at most any department store. 

I use an airbrush but even brushing, it does need to be dilute about 2 to 1. Once dry the finish results are light weight and permanently stuck there. Another upside is that acrylics offer some of the brighter colors and have a wide spectrum of choices to work with.
Fly like your mad at it.
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Sidewayskiwi
e3_Scott wrote:


In my experience, it depends whether you want your plane to look good a foot away or want to see it more easily 100 ft away.  Magic marker adds essentially no weight, I have "painted" several planes with markers in the past.  After that, I use acrylic craft paints diluted with a 50/50 water/alcohol mix until it is about the consistency of coffee cream and then brush it on so that I have good control over how much paint is being applied.  This doesn't always make for the best coverage when looking at the plane up close and won't win any model shows, but when it is ripping by 50+ ft away, I'm not too worried about it, I just want to be able to see my plane so I don't lose orientation.

I have only painted one plane with foam safe Testor's spray paint which was very expensive, about $6 (Cdn) for a small can and my plane ended up quite heavy as I lack the skill to properly control how much paint is being applied.

I will continue with the magic marker or diluted acrylic craft paint as in my experience it helps my planes look reasonably good, is cheap and keeps the plane light.

Cheers,

Scott

HI SCOTT
Ths is marker pen with some some acrylic white painted bands and silver acrylic
yes up close its a bit "patchy" but 10 ft away a $million 
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Sidewayskiwi
TomMonton wrote:
You've already called it. The cheap 2oz hobby craft acrylics found at most any department store. 

I use an airbrush but even brushing, it does need to be dilute about 2 to 1. Once dry the finish results are light weight and permanently stuck there. Another upside is that acrylics offer some of the brighter colors and have a wide spectrum of choices to work with.

Had any issues with paint lifting the paper or do you treat the paper first ?  (minwax etc)
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Sidewayskiwi
F1wanabe wrote:
I've mentioned it before, but I believe the white of Depron or MPF is he lightest color! Use white whenever possible and accent the plane's shape with color. My eyes are pretty bad at a distance so I put color only on the top of the plane, and I only try to paint accents on it to show which direction the plane is flying. Unless I'm going for a scale look. But the F18 v4 is a good example...
LOL 
Yes it is and it looks so crisp and clean 
But vanity occasionally  prevails and i want to be in the cool kids group 
Yes age is cruel to eyesight (and just about every joint in the body
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Wildthing
transparent white works for me, looks just like bare foam 😉 
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solentlife
Water based Poster Paint .... dilute with water for lightweight ... neat if weight not a problem and want solid colour.
I'll fly anything if I can launch it ! Youtube : solentlifeuk
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WAFU892
1557953201380-2079395385.jpg what's the lightest paints/coverings for DTF 
Acrylic ? Spray can ?
Brand?
Share your experience
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WAFU892
Try https://www.graff-city.com/ I use the Amsterdam spray paint, only problem is it is a mat paint so I spray over it with Gloss from the same company called "MTN 300".
 
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solentlife
My poster paint is susceptible to any water ... so not advised to get caught in a shower !! It is also a matt ... 

To waterproof I use varnish. You can get it in matt, semi matt and gloss varieties. Thin it down with White Spirit and brush on.

I have rattle cans as the American's call Spraycans ... but problem is not the paint - but the propellant used. Because of the 'Green' movements and environmental claims - propellant has been changed in many to be Petroleum based .... which eats foam. Its ok - if you spray at reasonable distance and very light coats ... repeated to build up the colour ... but get a little carried away and the dreaded surface scarring occurs.
I'll fly anything if I can launch it ! Youtube : solentlifeuk
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Mozella
I've tried several finishing methods; acrylic from an airbrush over paper, Minwax plus rattle can paint, and colored packing tape over bare foam. 

I tend to favor the packing tape finish for several reasons.  When I paint, even after a Minwax coat, the paper tends to wrinkle even when I'm careful to use light coats; .......... now always, but the threat is always there.  And, with water based acrylic paint, there is always a risk that you will make the paper wet, with predictable results. 

A couple of months ago I did a test by cutting out the parts and stripping off the paper which I then saved and weighed.  I weighed the two rolls of tape I was going to use both before and after and after, allowing 5% for the tape which got trimmed off.  I determined that the tape is only very slightly lighter than the paper; not enough to call it a real weight savings.  However, when you consider that the packing tape produces a glossy, colorful, waterproof finish all in one step, it becomes quite attractive as a finishing method since anything you do to the paper covered foam to make it more water resistant and/or colorful will add weight.  Plus applying the tape is quick and once it's on, you're done; no drying no waiting, and no second or third step involved.  Plus the tape sticks to the foam much better than the paper so delamination is all but eliminated.

On smaller DTFB models with a box style fuselage, I strip the paper from both sides but only cover the outside with packing tape, leaving the inner surfaces bare, and that saves even more weight.  The packing tape also adds strength in some areas, especially edges, which most finishing methods don't.  You can overlap the tape on fuselage corners or wing leading edges, for example, to make them more robust.  You can also close out aileron, rudder, and elevator trailing edges by tapering the foam and then  bringing the upper and lower surface tape together stick-side-to-sticky-side to make a sharp trailing edge which won't frazzle over time.

For leading edges of surfaces which are one thickness, like most elevators and rudders for example, I like to glue on a plastic cocktail straw and then wrap the packing tape around from the upper surface to the lower surface to produce a nice looking rounded leading edge with very little weight gain. I buy the straws in batches of 500; they're cheap that way.

If you're not familiar with the packing tape method, look up Experimental Airlines to learn everything you need to know.  By the way, be sure you use the thin packing tape.
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