Weldmen Show full post »
unclejamal
Hi,
i did not find the right answer in the search. also the link for the moved thread doesn't work. Since i don't want to open a new thread, i dig out this old one.

my Turnigy 2200mAh LiPo's show signs of swelling (is this acutally the correct english term, or is it better to use inflated?). The question is, at which point the LiPo should not be used anymore, once they are swollen. Which amount of swelling tells me to discard my LiPos.
My LiPos are 2 years old. i used them 3 seasons/year. About every 2 weeks one cycle of discharging (by flying) and charging. Makes roughly 40 charging cycles for each of my two batteries. I use a TGY Accucel-6 charger in balancing mode. Current: 1.1amps (3S, 20C battery) I can post pictures of the batteries if you want to have a look at the slight swelling.

thank you for your comments
Quote 0 0
JettaManDan
Quote:
Hi,
i did not find the right answer in the search. also the link for the moved thread doesn't work. Since i don't want to open a new thread, i dig out this old one.

my Turnigy 2200mAh LiPo's show signs of swelling (is this acutally the correct english term, or is it better to use inflated?). The question is, at which point the LiPo should not be used anymore, once they are swollen. Which amount of swelling tells me to discard my LiPos.
My LiPos are 2 years old. i used them 3 seasons/year. About every 2 weeks one cycle of discharging (by flying) and charging. Makes roughly 40 charging cycles for each of my two batteries. I use a TGY Accucel-6 charger in balancing mode. Current: 1.1amps (3S, 20C battery) I can post pictures of the batteries if you want to have a look at the slight swelling.

thank you for your comments


you will get varying responses here. Once a pack swells it is usually too late. Many people watch theirs carefully and still use them. I have some packs that have puffed a little bit and still used them. But I put stickers on them and watch them carefully. A burst pack can cause a fire. If it swells to the point that it looks misshaped a lot..or is rock hard to the touch then you got issues. Better safe than sorry really. At the very least do not charge it unless it is in a safe location (lipo safe bag...cinder block outside etc) But if it gets bigger it's better to dispose of it. At the very least the pack will lose it's power quicker or not take a full charge soon.

Dan
My YouTube Channel - 250+ Video's! http://www.youtube.com/jettamandan09

I'm an R/C Junkie! 40+ planes - 12 Heli's - 6 multirotors - and ground vehicles galore! I've got issues.
Quote 2 0
FED50H
Quote:
My Li-Po battery is swelling up. Its all puffy. Not hot or anything, just puffed up. I charge it at .1 amps 3c 11.1V What am I doing wrong? I tried 2 discharge it also. I am using a Mystery charger balancer discharger. http://www.777model.com/en/productvi...arger%28Red%29 . Can ya help a brother out?


Might not be your charging habits...If it is being over driven....Such as your motor is pulling more than it can provide....It happens when you have too low of a C discharge....i have a 4 cell pack that got really puffy when I flew it in a large EDF...Best suggestion would be to cut the leads, soak it in salt water and get rid of it.
Quote 2 0
Airforce101
Careful when cutting the leads, only cut one lead at a time so as to not short-circuit the lipo with your cutters!
My avatar is what I look like after a "landing"...
Quote 1 0
XDmToter
I know the salt water soak method has been pushed by many people for a very long time, but I have a different point of view on that.

The theory is that the salt water is an electrolyte, so it will allow the pack to discharge slowly. Then when the voltage reaches zero, it is supposedly safe to discard.

However; Consider that salt water is also a very strong corrosive. Add to that the fact that electrolysis will be occurring at the battery terminals which is another oxidizing process. It's possible that the thin metal plates where the battery leads are soldered is actually corroding away to the point where the battery leads no longer make contact with the cell. Therefore, your volt meter will read zero volts, but the battery actually still has a charge within it.

I find it much more reliable to attach a string of LEDs or a resistor to the battery. This will allow the battery to drain very slowly without the corrosive effects of electrolysis and salt water.
Quote 3 0
XDmToter
Excellent info Here:
http://www.tjinguytech.com/charging-how-tos/lipo-terminology

and Here:
http://www.tjinguytech.com/charging-how-tos/lipo-problems

and Here:
http://www.tjinguytech.com/charging-how-tos/lipo-disposal
Quote 1 0
KK
Quote:
I know the salt water soak method has been pushed by many people for a very long time, but I have a different point of view on that.

The theory is that the salt water is an electrolyte, so it will allow the pack to discharge slowly. Then when the voltage reaches zero, it is supposedly safe to discard.

However; Consider that salt water is also a very strong corrosive. Add to that the fact that electrolysis will be occurring at the battery terminals which is another oxidizing process. It's possible that the thin metal plates where the battery leads are soldered is actually corroding away to the point where the battery leads no longer make contact with the cell. Therefore, your volt meter will read zero volts, but the battery actually still has a charge within it.

I find it much more reliable to attach a string of LEDs or a resistor to the battery. This will allow the battery to drain very slowly without the corrosive effects of electrolysis and salt water.

Yeah, I completely agree to that!
I use a small bulb used to light up the car interior thats rated for ~1A (this way the battery doesnt go hot)... once the bulb goes out I let the battery sit for about an hour (here the cells recover a little and still have some power left) and reconnect until it goes out again completely... then I solder the leads, do the salt water treatment and dispose off...
Quote 1 0
FED50H
Quote:
I know the salt water soak method has been pushed by many people for a very long time, but I have a different point of view on that.

The theory is that the salt water is an electrolyte, so it will allow the pack to discharge slowly. Then when the voltage reaches zero, it is supposedly safe to discard.

However; Consider that salt water is also a very strong corrosive. Add to that the fact that electrolysis will be occurring at the battery terminals which is another oxidizing process. It's possible that the thin metal plates where the battery leads are soldered is actually corroding away to the point where the battery leads no longer make contact with the cell. Therefore, your volt meter will read zero volts, but the battery actually still has a charge within it.

I find it much more reliable to attach a string of LEDs or a resistor to the battery. This will allow the battery to drain very slowly without the corrosive effects of electrolysis and salt water.


If they corrode that fast then that is amazing...How long do you think the battery is soaking? I cut the all the leads off...Balance charger and the T connector. To each his own. Main point was to be cautious with a puffy battery.
Quote 0 0