mmmJason
Hey guys, noob here. So at some point last, year, I blew you my speed control on my super lightning (Sports Flier's Super Lightning, basically seems like a Sky Hawk knockoff.) I'm guessing I blew the speed control because no flight controls work and when I inspected the plane, the wires leading form the speed control to the motor were melted.

So I'm home for the summer, and trying to get this plane back in the air.

My question is, which speed control do I get? I'd like to run an 8.4 to 9.6 NiMH, but I may later want to go 11.1 lipo. I'm guessing I need an Exceed RC Proton 18A Brushless ESC, but I don't even know what brushless means. Also, if my speed control is fried, is there a good chance other parts might have been fried too? Any tips/suggestions? Thanks!
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LukeWarm
What's wrong with Brushed motors:

    • Periodic maintenance is required, and many customers do not have a lathe to turn the commutator.
    • They have a Lower speed range due to mechanical limitations on the brushes.
    • The brush arcing generates wear and electrical noise.
    • If it's in a lock can, it's disposable.
    • If you run it hard, it will have a short life.
    • They are heavy and inefficient, when you compare them to the AC brushless motors most of us use.


Brushed DC motors, Brushless DC motors, and Brushless AC motors all use different controllers:


Brushless DC motors, and Brushless AC motors are both controlled by a DC electric source (let’s say an 11 volt battery) via an integrated inverter which produces a 3 phase AC electric signal to drive the motor. The biggest difference between the Brushless AC motor controller and the Brushless DC controller is the AC motor controller uses sin waves that vary from -11 volts to +11 volts, and the DC controller uses Square waves (pulse) that vary from 0 volts to +11 volts.

The biggest difference between the Brushless motor controller and the Brushed controller is, the Brushless motor controller controls speed by varying the frequency of the 3 phase AC electric signal that it generates, the Brushed controller controls speed by varying the voltage of the DC electric signal that it sends to the motor. If you control the motor to run at a lower RPM the AC ESC saves energy, the DC ESC waste the energy by turning it in to heat.

Brushed motors and NiMH batteries are so heavy and out dated. A brushless motor and a LiPo battery are Cheaper, more reliable, and have significantly more power at less weight. The ESC is also a lot cheaper and more efficient.

Post number one in the Resources thread has many short cuts that may interest you, like this one How an AC Motor and its ESC work !!
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LukeWarm
Quote:
My question is, which speed control do I get? I'd like to run an 8.4 to 9.6 NiMH, but I may later want to go 11.1 lipo. I'm guessing I need an Exceed RC Proton 18A Brushless ESC, but I don't even know what brushless means. Also, if my speed control is fried, is there a good chance other parts might have been fried too? Any tips/suggestions? Thanks!


If one part of your power system fries, 80% of the time, the rest of the system is fine.

A bad motor will take a ESC out, but it rarely happens the other way around.

http://www.rcpowers.com/community/threads/rcpowers-master-parts-list.8300/

















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mmmJason
Welp. My brushless speed control came in, and it turns out my motor is brushed. Cool
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