whatmovesyou
One of the past discussions years ago was trying to slow down landing speed. One of the ways to slow down landing speed is to be at a higher angle of attack but it needs stability and not do any wing wobble.

So to improve on my STOL( Bobcat, where there are two rudders) I came up with the bright idea of doing a " 2D extension on the tail" That is whatever the thickness of the rudder is, just double it's dimension and glue it on the rudder. What it is going to do is create a force opposing thrust and of course change the airflow pattern around the rudder. Rudders don't move, adjustable rudder is in front of prop.
Top View

P1010089.JPG 

Now the "2D factor"

P1010090.JPG 

So, here it is after, noticing that the tail is at an angle.



Designers have put strips on ailerons, elevators, to slow it down, but haven't seen(not drag brakes) strips on the rudder. So wanted to see what will happen overall.

Took it out to fly and it blew me away. As I mentioned before, the tail is slanted, so as it took off, it immediately took a nose up attitude due to the pitching force. With no wind, it increased my angle of attack on landing approach. Solid as a rock with no wing rocking at all. Same for takeoff, assumed a 90 degree takeoff as soon as wheel left ground. Angle was about a 30 degree and it was moving slow.
Control is mainly throttle to keep it on the ragged edge. Winds picked up and the angle became steeper where the wind topped out about 5-6 mph, it descended at a 45 degree angle with no wing rock. Had to lessen it as you land for it hits the rudder.
After a couple of flights and about 25 landings, it certain proved that I reached a new level of a steeper and slower approach to landing. Even enjoyed "wind surfing" in front of me when there was a steady wind.

As soon as I got home, took my 3D airplane for hovering and applied a "2D" to the rudder. Wow, what an improvement and less work to hold a hover. Will report more after I get some more runs.

Will get some video shortly and isn't it nice for once in awhile to have an idea work.

P1010092.JPG 
I like to design and fly unique planes.
Quote 7 0
jimbosflyin
Quote:
One of the past discussions years ago was trying to slow down landing speed. One of the ways to slow down landing speed is to be at a higher angle of attack but it needs stability and not do any wing wobble.

So to improve on my STOL( Bobcat, where there are two rudders) I came up with the bright idea of doing a " 2D extension on the tail" That is whatever the thickness of the rudder is, just double it's dimension and glue it on the rudder. What it is going to do is create a force opposing thrust and of course change the airflow pattern around the rudder. Rudders don't move, adjustable rudder is in front of prop.
Top View

[ATTACH=full]56329[/ATTACH]

Now the "2D factor"

[ATTACH=full]56330[/ATTACH]

So, here it is after, noticing that the tail is at an angle.



Designers have put strips on ailerons, elevators, to slow it down, but haven't seen(not drag brakes) strips on the rudder. So wanted to see what will happen overall.

Took it out to fly and it blew me away. As I mentioned before, the tail is slanted, so as it took off, it immediately took a nose up attitude due to the pitching force. With no wind, it increased my angle of attack on landing approach. Solid as a rock with no wing rocking at all. Same for takeoff, assumed a 90 degree takeoff as soon as wheel left ground. Angle was about a 30 degree and it was moving slow.
Control is mainly throttle to keep it on the ragged edge. Winds picked up and the angle became steeper where the wind topped out about 5-6 mph, it descended at a 45 degree angle with no wing rock. Had to lessen it as you land for it hits the rudder.
After a couple of flights and about 25 landings, it certain proved that I reached a new level of a steeper and slower approach to landing. Even enjoyed "wind surfing" in front of me when there was a steady wind.

As soon as I got home, took my 3D airplane for hovering and applied a "2D" to the rudder. Wow, what an improvement and less work to hold a hover. Will report more after I get some more runs.

Will get some video shortly and isn't it nice for once in awhile to have an idea work.

[ATTACH=full]56331[/ATTACH]

Who would have thought.
Parkflyers International 
Quote 0 0
whatmovesyou
Did 4 runs after getting it in trim doing "3D HOVERING with the strip on the rudder. So 2d is now part of 3D!!

Surprised about the reduction of hand movement in the rudder to now keep the wings level. It is like adding expo or something . Other point is now I don't deflect the rudder as much due to the lip on the rudder. So I intend to keep it on since plane is not meant for speed and the drag doesn't seem to be detrimental. Have tried other 3D stuff and it doesn't seem to effect it.
I like to design and fly unique planes.
Quote 3 0
bogusbandit56
Quote:
One of the past discussions years ago was trying to slow down landing speed. One of the ways to slow down landing speed is to be at a higher angle of attack but it needs stability and not do any wing wobble.

So to improve on my STOL( Bobcat, where there are two rudders) I came up with the bright idea of doing a " 2D extension on the tail" That is whatever the thickness of the rudder is, just double it's dimension and glue it on the rudder. What it is going to do is create a force opposing thrust and of course change the airflow pattern around the rudder. Rudders don't move, adjustable rudder is in front of prop.
Top View

[ATTACH=full]56329[/ATTACH]

Now the "2D factor"

[ATTACH=full]56330[/ATTACH]

So, here it is after, noticing that the tail is at an angle.



Designers have put strips on ailerons, elevators, to slow it down, but haven't seen(not drag brakes) strips on the rudder. So wanted to see what will happen overall.

Took it out to fly and it blew me away. As I mentioned before, the tail is slanted, so as it took off, it immediately took a nose up attitude due to the pitching force. With no wind, it increased my angle of attack on landing approach. Solid as a rock with no wing rocking at all. Same for takeoff, assumed a 90 degree takeoff as soon as wheel left ground. Angle was about a 30 degree and it was moving slow.
Control is mainly throttle to keep it on the ragged edge. Winds picked up and the angle became steeper where the wind topped out about 5-6 mph, it descended at a 45 degree angle with no wing rock. Had to lessen it as you land for it hits the rudder.
After a couple of flights and about 25 landings, it certain proved that I reached a new level of a steeper and slower approach to landing. Even enjoyed "wind surfing" in front of me when there was a steady wind.

As soon as I got home, took my 3D airplane for hovering and applied a "2D" to the rudder. Wow, what an improvement and less work to hold a hover. Will report more after I get some more runs.

Will get some video shortly and isn't it nice for once in awhile to have an idea work.

[ATTACH=full]56331[/ATTACH]

I have seen 3D planes with these device on all the control surfaces.
Wot, no Depron?
Quote 1 0
whatmovesyou
Quote:
I have seen 3D planes with these device on all the control surfaces.


I know a lot of the lightweight indoor models have it on the rudder. Haven't seen any that fly outside and especially in the wind. Would be interested if you can find one that has pictures and a video to show the effect in the wind.

I am very interested in only 1/2D overhanging strips to 1 D strips in width, not real wind stuff. The reason being for instance, is doing a rolling circle with wind or inverted harrier would be very detrimental with a large surface on the end of the rudder. Right now, I find my timing is off due to the addition to the lip when deflected , so will work on a evaluation to see the final results. For hoving, really find it reduces the workload of the pilot. Let 2 3D guys try it, found it really helps in hovering.
I like to design and fly unique planes.
Quote 0 0