ifguqerfg79t
I shall post this again, in a place more suited for this topic.
So for some inexplicable reason no one will ever know, I randomly came up with a much simpler way to move control surfaces without needing glue, control rods or control horns.
But first, how I mount my servos, with zipties and velcro. Seems flimsy but it won't budge (I tried to force it out and I ripped off the wing, was planning on doing so anyways)
Photo on 21-7-13 at 12.09 PM.jpg 
This was a previous plane I had tried out so there's still control rods and horns.
And this is how I...ummm...control the control surface.
Photo on 21-7-13 at 12.11 PM.jpg 
One plus point for this set up is that there is no need for measuring, cutting and bending wires and no worry for bendy wires.

Works really well, though I had to hold it cos I didn't want to install it onto the scrapped plane.


In all, this control set up is much easier, the rate of the control surface failing is reduced, you don't need to measure and cut out control rods and you can use this method on practically EVERY plane.
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ifguqerfg79t
Though I do not recommend this onto small control surfaces...
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trumpy959
Are you able to get the proper CG as indicated in the plans mounting the servo's in this manner? I realize there is less weight without the control wire's and such, but my first thought would be it put's the bulk of the servo weight farther behind the CG onto the tail surface which would make the typical tail heavy scenario even worse ... just wondering?

Thanks
RT
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ifguqerfg79t
That's another problem for already designed planes, move the battery forward but if that's not enough, add weights in the front, not too much, maybe just the weight of the control rods and horns...
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ifguqerfg79t
I was planning on using KF4 on the plane which the added forward weight would counteract the weight on the tail, might still move the battery though...
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ifguqerfg79t
Hopefully the plane isn't very picky...
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poormansairforce
I've been doing this for a while and the catch is that you add weight further back in the case of elevons and rudder as mentioned above and ideally you should have a Tx that can adjust endpoints, subtrim, etc. to compensate for building errors etc. I normally design the plane so I can just sink my servos into a pocket. One bad thing that can happen is the resolution is not as good as a pushrod setup depending on the plane and surface deflections needed. But there is no slop and like you said there are no push rods to fuss with.
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whatmovesyou
Tough looking at the picture, but "Is the control surface pivit point in line with the servo screw?
I like to design and fly unique planes.
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