Sidewayskiwi
OK 
Basic RCP designs leave the score of the score & fold on the outside 
Leaving you a fill in job ( like I do ) or leave it open
Using DTF anyone leave the paper on the outside and bevel cut the inside giving a nice clean outside profile ?
Thoughts?
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Wildthing
Strength is better and it will look prettier but remember to adjust your plans because your fold line will be out say 6mm in width on a 90 degree fold so will the panel widths.  
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jimbosflyin
OK 
Basic RCP designs leave the score of the score & fold on the outside 
Leaving you a fill in job ( like I do ) or leave it open
Using DTF anyone leave the paper on the outside and bevel cut the inside giving a nice clean outside profile ?
Thoughts?
e3Scott is the guy that has come far with DTF and these planes,useing min wax and special build techniques.He has videos of it on youtube I beleave.
Parkflyers International 
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e3_Scott
OK 
Basic RCP designs leave the score of the score & fold on the outside 
Leaving you a fill in job ( like I do ) or leave it open
Using DTF anyone leave the paper on the outside and bevel cut the inside giving a nice clean outside profile ?
Thoughts?


Leaving the paper on adds weight, anytime you can remove the paper on DTF and use other methods like sanding first to reduce the profile of the open score line then fill with either scrap foam or very light filler, your plane will end up much lighter and should fly better.  I take all the paper off the foam on my fuselages when building with DTF and in the one plane I built entirely of DTF also removed it from the score and fold intakes.  You can then reinforce areas in the intakes with small amounts of tape, fiberglass drywall tape and glue spread thin, etc to give it durability. 

Personally when building with DTF I try to build lighter and remove the paper wherever I can.  I would rather have a plane that flies better than looks better. 

Cheers,

Scott
Park Jet noise...the "other" sound of freedom😎
#ParkJetnoise #ParkJetpilot
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Sidewayskiwi
e3_Scott wrote:


Leaving the paper on adds weight, anytime you can remove the paper on DTF and use other methods like sanding first to reduce the profile of the open score line then fill with either scrap foam or very light filler, your plane will end up much lighter and should fly better.  I take all the foam off my fuselages when building with DTF and in the one plane I built entirely of DTF also removed it from the score and fold intakes.  You can then reinforce areas in the intakes with small amounts of tape, fiberglass drywall tape and glue spread thin, etc to give it durability. 

Personally when building with DTF I try to build lighter and remove the paper wherever I can.  I would rather have a plane that flies better than looks better. 

Cheers,

Scott

yea i use scrap foam and sanding to fill in crevices as i like a nice smooth airframe 
what treatments /reinforcing to you put on the paperless DTF portions?
regards
robf
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e3_Scott

yea i use scrap foam and sanding to fill in crevices as i like a nice smooth airframe 
what treatments /reinforcing to you put on the paperless DTF portions?
regards
robf


None if I can help it.

Cheers,

Scott
Park Jet noise...the "other" sound of freedom😎
#ParkJetnoise #ParkJetpilot
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JTiger
All the Flite Test models are designed for DTF like you mention. I think the big advantage is when you're making curves where depron or MPF can crack if you don't tape over the outside. And like you say it also makes pretty nice looking folds.
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