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trying2fly


I didn't take any chances when learning to fly RC planes. My first RC plane was a modified "little UHU" (as seen below) which used to be a non-RC glider until someone threw the whole thing in a bin after it had crashed and broken its wing. I took the thing home, repaired the wing and added 2 servos, a 27 MHz 2-channel receiver from a bad RC boat and a small battery, made the rudder and elevator work and launched the thing off the top of a slope. Flew beautifully and behaved as desired, until I wanted to get a little more altitude on take-off and tried to launch the thing with a way too powerful elastic band and ripped the wing in half in the process.

After a few failed builds of different kinds of planes and a few cheapo planes I encountered a demo-PC at my local electronics store which was running some version of RealFlight and THAT'S where I learned to fly the good stuff. At first it was set up to let people try and fly a helicopter, but someday I went ahead and asked the stuff if they could change the model for me and chose a 4 channel trainer for the start, which I flew flawlessly within 5 minutes. Some time later the transmitter on the stylized cockpit was replaced with one that would let the pilot enter the various menus and choose their plane and location, and that's when I did almost everything from slope gliding with heavy simulated turbulences (I'd never actually fly in such conditions unless my glider was just HUGE) to flyin' a freakin' Harrier that could actually hover using its tilting exhausts.

And since RC flying is actually a rather rare hobby in Germany there were always lots of people watching me and, as soon as I'd left the booth, trying their hand at flying and failing badly as if I'd made it look like child's play.

Having learned to fly just about every single model the simulator included I often decided to teach some people when I had the time for it and I'm sure quite a bunch of them got into the hobby some time after.

And of course it was only after learning to fly in the simulator that I dared to actually fly the 4 channel stuff.
   You have definitely mastered the simulators!!!!   Out here I have found that going from 250 ft.   down to about 150 ft. and then on to about 20 ft.  my planes pass through 3 different wind rivers(not all the same direc).  Couple that with 4-5 thermals and the usual winds, I have all that I can handle!!!  As  a "do your best" pilot I am not sure a simulator would help me!!  I am probably beyond help!!LOL   chas
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DualDesertEagle
trying2fly wrote:
   You have definitely mastered the simulators!!!!   Out here I have found that going from 250 ft.   down to about 150 ft. and then on to about 20 ft.  my planes pass through 3 different wind rivers(not all the same direc).  Couple that with 4-5 thermals and the usual winds, I have all that I can handle!!!  As  a "do your best" pilot I am not sure a simulator would help me!!  I am probably beyond help!!LOL   chas


Well when I was slope-gliding in RealFlight there was quite a bit of turbulence and wind I had to deal with, and I think the more sophisticated simulators let u set different weather so u can practice flying in bad conditions.

And if it's the flying skills that u feel ur lacking at then a simulator is definitely gonna help alot. And after I realized how well my simulator training transferred to the real world hobby I even feel confident that I could fly an actual RC helicopter just fine and bring it back in 1 piece. And since I understand how it all works I can say the same for a real one, tho since screwing up at that could easily become dangerous I'd prefer a flight instructor next to me until I'd got used to the thing. I've even learned about pilot induced oscillation and so I can try and avoid that, should I ever get a chance to fly either an RC or a real heli.
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trying2fly


Well when I was slope-gliding in RealFlight there was quite a bit of turbulence and wind I had to deal with, and I think the more sophisticated simulators let u set different weather so u can practice flying in bad conditions.

And if it's the flying skills that u feel ur lacking at then a simulator is definitely gonna help alot. And after I realized how well my simulator training transferred to the real world hobby I even feel confident that I could fly an actual RC helicopter just fine and bring it back in 1 piece. And since I understand how it all works I can say the same for a real one, tho since screwing up at that could easily become dangerous I'd prefer a flight instructor next to me until I'd got used to the thing. I've even learned about pilot induced oscillation and so I can try and avoid that, should I ever get a chance to fly either an RC or a real heli.
          I guess I am too cheap to get any thing like you have and probably not nearly as talented as you are at flying.  I taught myself how to fly with my first plane being a HawkSky.  I still have the plane and use it for photography (finding deer herds bedding up under mesquite) for people and it weighs   so much after so many repairs that it is veritably  unbothered by any turbulence.  People that can derive significant benefits from simulators are usually both fortunate($) and talented.  I lose on both scores but I love this hobby, love to fly and build, and nothing replaces that feeling of controlling remotely an object that you built and able to watch it fly under your total control.  It is all so much fun!!! chas
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DualDesertEagle
It seems u didn't read the post before my last one quite carefully enough. I don't actually HAVE RealFlight, I just spent hours at a time on the demo-PC at my local tech store. Back then I couldn't afford it either, and now it's just more fun to fly actual RC planes over simulated ones. After I'd basically mastered every single model the simulator offered back then it simply started to become boring, and I do feel like I've got all the RC flying skills I'll ever need. Apart from the occasional powered glider (if Germany's SH!TTY LAWS still allow that) I'll most likely stick with small and nimble foamies which are much easier to repair and thus one can just go absolutely crazy without worrying too much about totaling the plane.
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trying2fly
It seems u didn't read the post before my last one quite carefully enough. I don't actually HAVE RealFlight, I just spent hours at a time on the demo-PC at my local tech store. Back then I couldn't afford it either, and now it's just more fun to fly actual RC planes over simulated ones. After I'd basically mastered every single model the simulator offered back then it simply started to become boring, and I do feel like I've got all the RC flying skills I'll ever need. Apart from the occasional powered glider (if Germany's SH!TTY LAWS still allow that) I'll most likely stick with small and nimble foamies which are much easier to repair and thus one can just go absolutely crazy without worrying too much about totaling the plane.
   Sorry, I didn't mean to imply you were among the elite...you came up the hard way on RC and that is why you are so proficient.  I didn't read your previous  post closely enough.  My error.  You deserve much credit for your many hours on the demo-PC. I would have probably done something like that if I were not out here on the other end of the earth.  I certainly hope Germany's Laws don't daunt your flying experiences.  Out here I don't have but one remote neighbor for miles and miles so I can fly anything.......or at least try !!!!  LOL   chas
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DualDesertEagle
No harm done.
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bogusbandit56
trying2fly wrote:
   You have definitely mastered the simulators!!!!   Out here I have found that going from 250 ft.   down to about 150 ft. and then on to about 20 ft.  my planes pass through 3 different wind rivers(not all the same direc).  Couple that with 4-5 thermals and the usual winds, I have all that I can handle!!!  As  a "do your best" pilot I am not sure a simulator would help me!!  I am probably beyond help!!LOL   chas


My first model plane was a Graupner Uhu, my aunts sent it to me for my 6 or 7 birthday.
It was balsa sheet and balsa pod with a built up wing covered with tissue. My dad built it and on the maiden flight it went straight into an oak tree and that was the last we saw of it.  That gave me the bug for model planes but it wasn`t until I had a full time job that I could afford to buy and build my own planes. Then I made up for all those lost years😃.
Wot, no Depron?
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