KK Show full post »
lysle42
Quote:
...Something like that. Found it on a home center store. Not made for RC, but it works... Flash, strobe, dimmer etc, and various other light effects. Can be controlled by IR remote control, or via my homemade Servo switch.







Alphajet LED Demo

Will that explains some of the UFO reports from that area
Homer
<'(((><
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Fz1Fazer
@malukk
Man you got me,
I didn't know that I can buy cheap strips with WS2812B controller, only knowing the more expensive PCB light brackets for copters like my F450 Flamewheel and controlled by FC.
However, a simple Arduino Nano is much cheaper than any readybuilt light controller and is highly configurable.
The good thing, I have an unused Arduino Nano v3.0, a lot of Rs, Caps, BECs and an 8 LED WS2812B bracket to test with in my toolbox, so let's give it a try.
Thank's for your great "HowTo"!
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KK
Quote:
@malukk
Man you got me,
I didn't know that I can buy cheap strips with WS2812B controller, only knowing the more expensive PCB light brackets for copters like my F450 Flamewheel and controlled by FC.
However, a simple Arduino Nano is much cheaper than any readybuilt light controller and is highly configurable.
The good thing, I have an unused Arduino Nano v3.0, a lot of Rs, Caps, BECs and an 8 LED WS2812B bracket to test with in my toolbox, so let#s give it a try.
Thank's for your great "HowTo"!

I am glad you like it! You are right about how cheap this system is yet so modular and powerful!
I look forward to what you do with this... if you need any help, feel free to post it here...
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Fz1Fazer
Thanks malukk,
I've bought the Nano to play with after I came in contact with that stuff by my 3D printer that works with a MEGA2650 R3, RAMPS 1.4 and Marlin. I know that you can do a lot of things with that small MCUs but never took me the time to work with it, so the only things I did with Arduino IDE was to customize the FW of my 3D printer and the multi protocol TX module that I use for my smallish indoor quads and 100 and 200 class helis.
You see I'm a noob, whenever it's not my first contact with Arduino.
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Wildthing
My other led strips finally showed up so I can start building the set for loader #2
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Wildthing
Well the weather turned crappy again, winds picked up and it started to rain (No Snow) . Finely got the 2nd loader home, spring time so lets get all the oil changes and servicing done on all the equipment plus lets get the new led strip lights installed on this guy. Thank you again Malukk for all the help, these guys look great.

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blkbaron
Been off with the fairies lately but pleased to see Jeff hasn't taken a backward step. Have you used the Arduino Tiny, Malukk. I saw a club member with a red strobe being driven by the Tiny. 6 outputs. doesn't take much space. Would it work with the leds that we are using here?
If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.
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KK
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Been off with the fairies lately but pleased to see Jeff hasn't taken a backward step. Have you used the Arduino Tiny, Malukk. I saw a club member with a red strobe being driven by the Tiny. 6 outputs. doesn't take much space. Would it work with the leds that we are using here?

I haven't personally used it as nano is small enough... although I cant imagine it being that different... i think it will do the basic things that we do here but may not be able to do serial monitor which makes life very difficult in programming esp. when you have input parameters controlling the lights - just like my edf afterburner lights for example...
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KK
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Well the weather turned crappy again, winds picked up and it started to rain (No Snow) . Finely got the 2nd loader home, spring time so lets get all the oil changes and servicing done on all the equipment plus lets get the new led strip lights installed on this guy. Thank you again Malukk for all the help, these guys look great.


Looks great!
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Wildthing
Well little brother came home today , had to fix some torn wires for the fancy led system Malukk helped or should I say programed for me , went through some tall brush and snagged the wires, I am 1 pixel short now.
It had torn the copper plates out of the led strip so I had to move in one , I figured I would just solder the wires in without removing the old one, didn't work, once I cut the dead one out it all fired up. So I did learn that you can't start a feed except on the lead led.


2018_0222_115524_001.JPG 
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F1wanabe
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[Sec]Introduction:[/Sec]
Who doesn't like to light up a RC plane using fancy LED lights? I think we all do! Especially as the daylight gets shorter and shorter... It not only enables us to fly planes in the night but also make them look cool in air... I am writing this basic [detailed] tutorial on how to implement programmable LEDs to light up our aircrafts and have fun!


[Sec]Materials Required:[/Sec]

1) WS2812B LED lights: You can buy them in various configurations but most popular for our use would be these three configurations: 30 LEDs/meter, 60 LEDs/meter or 144 LEDs/meter. You can buy them from various sources eBay, Amazon, Bangood, adafruit (neopixel), etc...
** Make sure not to get confused with other models such as WS2801, WS2811, ANALOG single color or ANALOG multicolor RGB LEDs and others... **

2) Arduino Nano: This is the Arduino board that we'll be using because of its small form factor making it easy to install in planes/drones.

3) Capacitor: A 100uF - 1000uF capacitor would work well. 1000uF capacitor (16V or 25V are popular) is recommended.

4) Resistor: A resistor rated between 200ohm - 470ohm would work well... I am using a 470ohm resistor!

5) Misc.: A soldering station, a dedicated 3A-5A BEC is recommended, LiPo battery, computer with Arduino IDE software and some patience


[SEC]Background Info:[/SEC]

1) WS2812b LED lights: The cool part about these LEDs is you can address each LED individually in a strip to control the color and the pattern of display. This allows us to create cool designs and effects easily! This is how the strip typically looks like:

[ATTACH=full]47222[/ATTACH]

Here are some important details about the strips:

-> Shown above in the picture are 3 different configurations of LEDs you can get.

-> There are 3 copper pads between each led unit in the strip:


    • GND or "-": Ground (or common) connection


    • Din or Di: Data Input - the data signal to LED is provided thru this connection


    • Dout or Do: Data Output - This can be connected directly to "Din" to transfer data to next LED in line


    • 5V or "+": Connect +5V Power supply here


**The "data input" and "data output" pins are usually in the center if not specified**

-> The LED strips can be trimmed to your required length by cutting off at the center of the copper pads (as indicated by the red dotted line in the picture above)

-> The direction of data flow is indicated by the arrow printed on the LED strip (as depicted by yellow box in the picture above) - this also means that we can connect or "chain" multiple strips together by keeping the data flow [arrow pointing for both strips] in same direction... i.e. the "Dout" always connects to "Din"!

-> A single LED/pixel on strip consists of a small chip plus 3 LEDs (emit red, blue or green colors) integrated together. Combination of these 3 colors at different intensities give us different color combinations!


2) Arduino Nano: This is a small yet powerful board based on the Atmega328p chip for controlling our LEDs. We can program this board via USB cable and using the Arduino IDE software. This is how it looks like:

[ATTACH=full]47223[/ATTACH]


3) Capacitor: Since the power consumption of LED can widely vary depending on the color of each pixel, a 1000uF capacitor connected in parallel with the +5V power and GND will protect the LED strip from damaging!

[ATTACH=full]47225[/ATTACH]

Note: capacitors have polarity! The "GND" pin on capacitor is indicated by "-" sign... The short length of pin on the capacitor is also an indication of "GND" pin


4) Resistor:A small 470ohm resistor should be connected between Arduino's data output and LED's data input connections to help protect the data pin!


5) Power requirements: A total of 5V is needed to power our LEDs however, each LED/pixel on the strip will consume about 60mA (or 0.06A) of current maximum (when red, blue and green leds within the pixel are all on at max intensities)... That being said we can calculate the current requirements for our project, for e.g.:

-> 1 meter strip with 30 LED/meter = 30 x 0.06A = 1.8A total
-> 1 meter strip with 60 LED/meter = 60 x 0.06A = 3.6A total
-> 1 meter strip with 144 LED/meter = 144 x 0.06A = 8.64A total


So to calculate your power requirements, simply multiply number of LED/pixel you are using by 0.06A and thats your current requirement. So choose a BEC accordingly! 5A BEC usually is more than enough for most of our projects!


[Sec]Procedure:[/Sec]



    • In menu section, select Sketch -> Include Library -> Manage Libraries.... Type "NeoPixel" in the text box and install "Adafruit NeoPixel by Adafruit"

    *if you are unable to install with method above then, download the Adafruit NeoPixel Library. Simply click the "clone or download" button on the upper right side and select "Download Zip". Goto Sketch -> Import Library -> Add Library and select the zip file you just downloaded!

    • Connect your Arduino board via USB. Note: Arduino connects with a mini-B USB cable


    • In menu section, goto Tools -> "serial port" or "port" and make sure the appropriate COM port is selected (in most cases this should be selected automatically if arduino is the only board connected to your system)

    * For Mac users, you can proceed to next steps however, in some windows systems you will not be able to select the com port in which case you need to install the drivers manually! To do so, goto control panel -> device manager. Look for "ports" or "unknown devices" with a yellow exclamation mark! Right click and select "update driver software". Next, choose "Browse my computer for driver software" -> Browse -> goto "C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\drivers" and select next to install the drivers

    • Select the appropriate board by selecting Tools -> Board, and select "Nano w/ATmega328" or "Arduino Duemilanove"


    • To load a test program, GoTo File -> Examples -> Adafruit NeoPixel -> strandtest


    • Modify on the code according to your needs:

    a) The pin number is where the signal output will be provided and is where your LED signal "Din" connects!
    b) Set the number of pixels/LED you have on your strip

    [ATTACH=full]47226[/ATTACH]

    • Click on the "tick mark button" (on the upper left corner) to "Verify" the code (you should see a message "done compiling" at the bottom)


    • To upload the code to Arduino, select "right arrow button" (next to the verify button). Your Arduino is all set!! You can disconnect the USB connection at this point.



[Sec]Electrical Connections:[/Sec]

Single pattern on different strips:

The signal output can be reliably given from pins D2 - D13 ("D" stands for digital output). Make sure that the pin # corresponds to the pin # in the software code. Double check to make sure there are no shorts! Below are the detailed connections on not only how to connect LED strip to Arduino but also chaining two strips:

[ATTACH=full]47227[/ATTACH]

Different patterns on two or more strips:

To control two individual strips differently, the connection diagram below can be used... The "+5V" and the "GND" cables can still be connected like previously shown however, the signal cable is directly connected to a different pin of Arduino. Similarly, more than two connections can be made to control several LED strips...

[ATTACH=full]47228[/ATTACH]

Once the lipo is connected, the loaded program will start running and at this point you should be able to see the lights operating to the given code. Once the sequence is complete, it will keep repeating until the battery is unplugged. To interrupt and restart the sequence anytime, press the reset button!

Here's how it should look like:



[Sec]Conclusions:[/Sec]

    • I really hope that you find this tutorial useful and will hopefully provide some basic understanding of programming LEDs using Arduino.


    • Its is really an easy way to bring out the best out of your projects.


    • I would highly recommend editing and playing around with the basic framework of code and see what happens/changes.


    • Finally, I really hope that this will help develop more creative LED lighting RC projects and make night flying even more fun and enjoyable!



KK, wow, how did I miss this thread? Excellent information- good resource for LED lights. And to thing I went to Walmart and picked up those cheapo strips in the auto section. This is so much more advanced!
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KK
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KK, wow, how did I miss this thread? Excellent information- good resource for LED lights. And to thing I went to Walmart and picked up those cheapo strips in the auto section. This is so much more advanced!

Yeah, its advanced and flexible the way you want it to be... Its easy to do it with my pre-written codes esp. for rc planes. The Video in my first page on F-22 afterburner lights were for the FRC-F22 plane.

I also optimized the afterburners for FRC Mig-29 twin using these lights and arduino. Although the videos dont do justice to how good it actually looks but its the best I could record:





You should try them!
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