RCPowers
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The MiG-29 V4 “SPEEDMASTER”




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[/parsehtml]“Outstanding”
In a word "Outstanding". The new MiGV4 is honestly one the coolest parkjets out there. The few design changes really made for an incredibly stable fly anymore. Very VERY well done.
By TomMonton | July 3, 2014 | Full review here

“You build 'em, toss 'em in the air, and they FLY!”
Let me just say one thing about RCPowers Jets... You build 'em, toss 'em in the air, and they FLY! I just came back from the Maiden of my 3rd RCPowers, the Mig-29 V4.
By christ_tall | August 3, 2014 | Full review here
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POWER SYSTEM

Motor:

ESC:

Prop:

Battery:

Servos:

Radio:


2200kv, 30A max

30A

6x4 APC

11.1v, 1600mAh, 20C

2-6 metal gear

2.4 GHz 6CH










SPECIFICATION

Scale:

Length:

Wing Span:

Wing Area:

Weight:

Channels:


1/16

41” (104 cm)

27” (69 cm)

2.9 sq ft (0.27 sq m)

16-26 oz (450 - 740 g)

3-6

















Get Started Building



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Quote 8 0
DavePowers
gibby1117 and his buddies have a fun going "stupid fast".


chris_tall gives some great commentary on how he dialed in his MiG-29 V4:


“The V4 is a pure joy to fly”
In summary, the V4 is a pure joy to fly and a great enough improvement over the V3 to justify buying the RCPowers package (even if you don’t intend on building any of the other planes). BTW, if you are a beginner builder and flyer, build your first plane stock. After that design, build, fly and post your modifications so we can all learn.
By sgmoran | June 8, 2014 | Full review here

“Easy to build, easy to repair, reliable, easy to fly”
And it would not be possible without any of you, Dave and Scott. I am grateful that you two have the ability to "look deeper", otherwise we would not have such amazing aircraft. Easy to build, easy to repair, reliable, easy to fly and finally, fun to fly! You and Scott have done an outstanding Job. I do not understand how to improve something that I already thought was perfect, already a year ago, when you released the V3 series.
By Airflow | June 3, 2014 | Full review here

“Goes to show how forgiving this frame truly is”
The MiG has a pretty wide COG for basic scale flight. One of its many forgiving features with this build. But you are correct in a final balance of this airframe. Once you find that sweet spot where you can punch out without pushing the nose up you're in a happy place and the plane will practically fly itself(a figure of speech). I've always used a felt tip and marked the placement on the foam to make it easier to hit on the next time out. I was out yesterday afternoon and we were playing in the wind.... one of those gusty days... and a small crowd had gathered behind us. Where did you buy these...yadda... yadda... How fast does it go. I'm doing speed runs and rolling out to show off a little and the plane is close enough where I could see a shutter in the one stabilizer. I burnt up that battery and landed for a fresh one when I noticed that the left side of the frame was cracked all the way through right behind the prop hole. The entire frame was only held on by one side.... sheesh....and it was still flying true. An easy fix well enough but it goes to show how forgiving this frame truly is under load... I'm glad it went well and you're able to take her out and fly another day.
By TomMonton | July 30, 2014 | Full review here

“The angled out vertical stabs really do the trick”

Mig-29 V4 Maiden Flight Report: Just got back from the maiden, and it flew awesome.
The NTM is a beast and this airframe handles it well. A little bit of zoom when given full power, but I had the same zoom effect on the Mig-29 V3. No issues with elevon flutter on the V4, which caused the ultimate demise on my V3. I think the straight hinge line on this V4 on the elevon, lends itself well to the design and reducing flutter. Really stable in the turns, the rudders perform great and the angled out vertical stabs really do the trick in keeping it stable without stall characteristics, just like Dave has been talking about during initial testing. The improved ailerons work great as well, she doesn't roll like a Dewalt Drill like the V3, much more scale in the aileron roll... The only structurally weak point for me was the base plate that the battery rest on, minor crack on landing from the weight of the 4 cell battery. I did not put much Foam Tac on this area in the build, so probably my fault. No big deal, but I am going to strengthen this area with some more Foam Tac and a strip of fiberglass tape. When you build the Mig-29 keep this in mind, the area directly beneath the battery where it connects to the intake nacelles needs to be built strong if carrying a heavy battery. Great design, and I look forward to many more flights on the Mig-29 V4. Now to start the SU-30 V4 lightweight edition and F-18 V4. I'm also interested to see how the SU-34 would react to the NTM Prop Drive 2700kv on it.
[parsehtml]By ColoradoFlyer | May 14, 2014 | Full review here







Get Started Building



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Dave Powers
The Parts I Use
Quote 3 0
Airflow
So this will be my first V4 probably late June or beginning of July.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
Quote 0 0
captarmour
Quote:
So this will be my first V4 probably late June or beginning of July.


im a little puzzled...r the verticals "toe'd in" or "toe'd out"? if I may, if the verticals r "toe'd in" with a yaw to the left i thought the right vertical would get more wind resistance and force it back to center...
Quote 0 0
F1wanabe
Captarmour, I've compared this to the toe in of the front wheels on your car. The tires on your car are angled in (usually only 1/16th of an inch) so that the opposing slip angles actually stabilize the straight line tracking of the car. Same with the Vertical Stabilizers on the mig. A slight toe in will give you aerodynamic stability in a straight line. I can imagine too much toe will result in a parachute effect from increased drag, but the amount Dave and Scott are using would be negligible at our speeds. Neat idea!
Quote 4 0
Airflow
Capt. Toe'd in, just like Greg explains! This provides a good directional stability.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
Quote 1 0
Airflow
Hmm, I need to move the 3648 back a few inches, as I did on my Mig V3 to get the correct center of gravity with 6s
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
Quote 3 0
captarmour
Quote:
Captarmour, I've compared this to the toe in of the front wheels on your car. The tires on your car are angled in (usually only 1/16th of an inch) so that the opposing slip angles actually stabilize the straight line tracking of the car. Same with the Vertical Stabilizers on the mig. A slight toe in will give you aerodynamic stability in a straight line. I can imagine too much toe will result in a parachute effect from increased drag, but the amount Dave and Scott are using would be negligible at our speeds. Neat idea!


Thanks, I understood that, the only part I really wondered was, with a left yaw the left vert would align more with the wind and feel less resistance, the right vert would feel more resistance and also be farther away from CG and would do most of the 'force it back to center'...
Maybe was just a typo...
Quote 1 0
F1wanabe
Or maybe it's the pilots left as opposed to our left?

http://www.frcfoamies.com
http://www.youtube.com/gstrysky
Quote 2 0
captarmour
ha ha, nice...reminds me of this mechanic asking which left, left facing forward or left facing back? he was asked how many left hands do u have? ;-D ... maybe we shud all start using port and starboard...
Quote 3 0
F1wanabe
Haha, that would do it! Which is port and which is starboard?!
I actually know that one...

http://www.frcfoamies.com
http://www.youtube.com/gstrysky
Quote 1 0
TomMonton
...The port/starboard side thing always confused me too...and i used to sail. It always said it's relevant to which way you docked and what if you pulled into a slip on the other side of the dock. I was however always able to find the cooler!

I've always viewed a plane from the tail forward..placing myself the same as the pilot and aligned myself accordingly left/right. This was a habit from flying prop planes where standing in front of a running plane and it did lurch forward... you could get hurt.
Fly like your mad at it.
Quote 1 0
CptChaos
I guess that's why they factory install red and green navlights on ships and airplanes.
Regards, Wolfgang
__________________
Gravity can be cruel !
Quote 1 0
Airflow
Also on children's bikes, sometimes.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
Quote 2 0
CptChaos
You must be kidding?! Makes me wonder again how we all could survive our childhood days without bicycle helmets, knee and ellbow pads, and... well... navlights!
Regards, Wolfgang
__________________
Gravity can be cruel !
Quote 5 0