acemakr
I've gotten some great advice and a lot of questions answered here. For that, I'm thankful.

What I miss is a hint on what pilot skill level is associated with with the various tips and tricks I'm able to find here.

Today, I read something on the Hawk Sky Owners Club about mixing the rudder and ailerons. The tip sounded solid. I was about half way to my DX6i manual to look up mixing and realized that the hot glue on my last Hawk Sky lawn dart was only dry for a couple of days.

I also read somewhere the F-22 and the Hawk Sky require just about equal pilot skills. I've got the F-22 sim in ClearView and am struggling with control surface throws - I have perfected the crash!

I've got to work on the basics and continue to try to know the difference between good, better, and great tips/tricks based on pilot skill.

Patience Grasshopper, Patience.
Quote 0 0
fishwhisperer83
The rudder/ail mix is a very good mod that is very easy. It makes a lot of difference in win and slow flight. When I fly, I automatically use ruder to bank really hard into a turn. Use it with a switch so you can still do clean rolls. Also the rudder shouldn't have a whole lot of throw on the mix. 50% is more than enough throw. And the f-22 is very easy to fly. The hawk sky and f23 both have good characteristics for beginners. The f22 is very floaty and doesn't tip stall a lot. The hawk sky can take a crash real well and provides high lift and is very stable on the roll with the polyhedral. It is pretty acrobatic with high throws but is very docile with lower throws
Quote 0 0
JettaManDan
yeah rudder and aileron mix is good for slower planes with larger wingspans....it's a matter of pulling the knowledge out of the air from people and getting it right...the same skills are involved..but reaction times are faster on a parkjet...it's all about stick time..sim and real..all i did was practice on the FMS basic simulator when i 1st started out for a few weeks..and i was good to go on the sticks on my 1st F-22 in no time..it will come
My YouTube Channel - 250+ Video's! http://www.youtube.com/jettamandan09

I'm an R/C Junkie! 40+ planes - 12 Heli's - 6 multirotors - and ground vehicles galore! I've got issues.
Quote 0 0
LukeWarm
Start simple and basic. Starting with step 5, is not a shortcut.
One of the biggest mistakes I see, is new pilots overbuild there first plane.

They build a 10 servo monstosity with 4 coats of paint that weighs a ton, then they install the prop on the motor backwards and crash a few times. Because it weighs so much, it hits the ground hard and take a while to repair if it is even repairable.

With a light plane, the CoG is less sensitive, cut the throttle and let go of the stick and it falls like a feather to the ground. With the prop installed on the motor backwards (wrong), inspight of loosing 40% on you power, it will still have enough power to stay airborn.

The idea is to get you up in the air and comfortable with a simple plane or park jet. Now that you've flown a few times and you're confident and comfortable enough to deal with some extra problems, you now have a good knowledge base of experience that will help you deal with the extra complexity you want to add to your plane. With this base, you can make intelligent decisions about what you add. Without this knowledge base, if you start with step 5, all of the problems you must solve to make your first successful flight can be overwhelming. Keep it simple; why would anyone want to tackle most of the problems this hobby has to offer, on their first flights.
Quote 0 0
GrumpyBear
Hi Ace, remember one thing "KISS", keep it simple. The mix you read about is used to co-ordinate turns. The rudder controls the yaw axis and in doing so when you roll, the tail of the airplane tends to skid inside the turn. The rudder is applied in the direction of roll to stop that skid.
I don't even have rudders on my F22 and the only time I thought I should have had them was landing in a cross wind. As you and I are newbies, IMHO I think the best advice is get the F22 flying as a basic 3 channel set-up, elverons and throttle. After mastering the basic set up then move on to some of the mixes that the guys describe here.
As you have said, patience grasshopper!!! GB.
Quote 1 0
e3_Scott
Quote:
I've gotten some great advice and a lot of questions answered here. For that, I'm thankful.

What I miss is a hint on what pilot skill level is associated with with the various tips and tricks I'm able to find here.

Today, I read something on the Hawk Sky Owners Club about mixing the rudder and ailerons. The tip sounded solid. I was about half way to my DX6i manual to look up mixing and realized that the hot glue on my last Hawk Sky lawn dart was only dry for a couple of days.

I also read somewhere the F-22 and the Hawk Sky require just about equal pilot skills. I've got the F-22 sim in ClearView and am struggling with control surface throws - I have perfected the crash!

I've got to work on the basics and continue to try to know the difference between good, better, and great tips/tricks based on pilot skill.

Patience Grasshopper, Patience.


Acemakr -

I just got back into the hobby in December after a long layoff dealing with some life stuff. When I first started off about 4 yrs ago, I made the mistake of building some scratchbuild 3D EPP planes which were not the best to learn on.

When I got back into the hobby, I knew I wanted to fly parkjets, but wanted to get some lead in stick time on something a little more forgiving before trying it out. I got a Bixler 2 from HK which is very similar to your Hawk Sky. I flew that plane for about 50-60 flights before trying my first parkjet and I am very, very glad I did. It has control surfaces for all three axis, so you can experiment with rudder on that plane and see what it does, although I found I rarely used mine, 95% of the time I was just steering with elevator and ailerons.

Granted, the Hawk Sky type airplanes and most of the parkjets are not terribly close in performance and characteristics (although I have never built or flown the F22 V2, so perhaps I am wrong), but I started off with an F35 V2 with elevons only and it was more than maneouverable enough to get me started in parkjets.

If you have a programmable radio, it is a godsend for us new people/novices as you can tame down the throws and put some expo in there to soften things up until you see how the plane reacts doing simple turns, then as you gain confidence you can increase the throws and lessen the expo of you want to before starting loops, rolls and other aerobatic moves. Many experienced pilots I have spoken to still fly with some expo just to "soften" the controls a bit and make the plane less twitchy, but each person is different.

I have only built one of my parkjets with rudders and in fact didn't use them too much at all. They are certainly handy to have at slow speeds or in high alpha to steer the plane, so if that is important to the type of flying you want to do, you might want to activate them.

I fully concur with GrumpyBear, the best idea might be to start off with a simple 3 channel setup with elevons only, take it easy and walk before you run.

The 50-60 flights I put into my Bixler before touching my first parkjet was an amazing foundation for my flying skills and I am very glad I had the patience to get the time on the sticks with that first.

The Hawk Sky might not be as sexy as the parkjets, but they will be there waiting for you, like anything else, I found the best thing that worked for me was just getting the stick time. I tried to have a plan of what I was going to do everytime I tossed my Bixler in the air and each time I went to the field I had a plan to try something new, either turn the rates up a bit, try a loop, try a roll, stall, tighter turns, whatever I could do to push my skills and confidence up just that little bit more.

Even after I first started flying my first parkjet, I still took my Bixler to the field and flew a "warm up" flight or two with it before I tossed my F35 in the air.

Not sure if my rambling has helped at all, but patience definitely paid off for me in my situation, the $70 I spent on my Bixler and the time I invested in flying it has paid off immensely in my skills and confidence with my parkjets.

Best of luck!

Cheers,

Scott
Park Jet noise...the "other" sound of freedom😎
#ParkJetnoise #ParkJetpilot
Quote 2 0
useless-thumbs
I too am a believer in keeping it simple to start with - I learned this the hard way by starting with a plane that I just couldn't fly. Having read the advice on this forum I then tried a Bixler 1 and have developed my (limited) skills from there.
Having said that, once you have mastered the basics, play around a bit so that you are put on your mettle as you fly. One step at a time is good.
Lawn darts - tree darts - window darts - wall darts - cable darts; they are all part of the learning curve as I have found out the hard way.

Stick with your Hawk Sky for the time being - thrash it and trash it - it will teach you loads.
Quote 2 0
Grey
Quote:
I've gotten some great advice and a lot of questions answered here. For that, I'm thankful.

What I miss is a hint on what pilot skill level is associated with with the various tips and tricks I'm able to find here.

Today, I read something on the Hawk Sky Owners Club about mixing the rudder and ailerons. The tip sounded solid. I was about half way to my DX6i manual to look up mixing and realized that the hot glue on my last Hawk Sky lawn dart was only dry for a couple of days.

I also read somewhere the F-22 and the Hawk Sky require just about equal pilot skills. I've got the F-22 sim in ClearView and am struggling with control surface throws - I have perfected the crash!

I've got to work on the basics and continue to try to know the difference between good, better, and great tips/tricks based on pilot skill.

Patience Grasshopper, Patience.


I'm with LukeWarm. Keep it simple!

I have a couple things I tell my friends that start in on RC.

The first rule of thumb that if you're still mastering the Art of Crashes, don't mess with anything! Keep it as simple as possible and keep flying until your babies are (usually) coming home safely.

The second rule of thumb is; If you see a piece of terminology that you don't understand, don't try it. Learning is best taken in shifts! You'll know when you are ready for more quite naturally and will seek it out, you don't have to stumble across it.

The third rule of thumb is don't try anything that people tell you "makes it easier to fly" if it involves doing anything to your transmitter or installing something new on your plane. It probably does BUT it's just one more thing for you to make a mistake with. Beginners make mistakes. That's a fact of life. As a beginner the best move you can make is keeping the number of possible mistakes you can make to a minimum!

Remember that these are "rule of thumb" only. There are exceptions that break every rule. If you run into one of those exceptions then by all means find a sensible way to break the rule, just make sure you approach it cautiously!
May all your crashes be spectacular!
Planes: RCPowers X-31EB V1, F-18EB V1, F-35EB V1, F-22EB V1 x 2, T-50 V1, EzFly Bomber (e-foamy.com), FunFighter 600mm F-4u Corsair, Mig 29 V2, Mig 29 v1.
Currently working on: Mig 29 v3, F-22 v3 To Do list: Rodrigo's OV10 Bronco; I swear I will get there one day .
Grey's Youtube Channel. - Grey's RC plane blog (it's new and a bit bare!)
Quote 1 0