Cristian
hEY Guys!
This is my first post on the blog and with it my first question as well.I am pretty (totally) new to the hobby and i started working on a project .my question is, if you build an airplane that is designed by u , how do u calculate or how do u make sure that the wings will generate enough lift. I get it that i need to get it up to a certain speed , but how go i know that my wings are the good shape or the good size in order to generate enough lift?

In future posts ill give more detail about the project.

Thanks a lot
hones:hones:hones:
IF I HAD WINGS...:sun:
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blaumph2cool
L = 1/2(P(V^2))AC

Where:
L = lift
P = air density
V = airspeed
A = wing area
C = lift coefficient at the angle of attack

However, its less of a true science for RC planes especially the smaller the scale and materials used.

Just put something on paper and then build it and have fun.

Please note: I am not an aeronautical engineer, I just play one on youtube.
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kaptondave
Maybe this guide to model aircraft design will be a bit more helpful:

http://adamone.rchomepage.com/guide.htm
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Cristian
Awesome, me too at first i thought that at times its a trial and error thing , obviously as you said blaumph2cool it depends of scaling but at the end it comes down to the fun of it ! Thanks a lot !
IF I HAD WINGS...:sun:
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Rcjetflyer2
Generally, the bigger the wing (compared to the fuse) the more lift you get and the slower the plane. Jets go faster because their wingspan is shorter. So less lift means you have to go faster to stay up.
Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center, University of Maryland
My Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPe7XrmOPtz4OjL6KGtvJMA
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teflondon
Quote:
L = 1/2(P(V^2))AC

exactly
but the only way to calculate Cl (coefficient of lift) is in a wind tunnel

Quote:
Generally, the bigger the wing (compared to the fuse) the more lift you get and the slower the plane. Jets go faster because their wingspan is shorter. So less lift means you have to go faster to stay up.


you can derive everything from the formula

if you want more lift you can
increase speed (V)
increase wing area (A)
increase wing curvature (Cl)
fly in colder air or higher pressure (P)
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MoTheG
Quote:
the only way to calculate Cl (coefficient of lift) is in a wind tunnel

you mean measure.
computers can calculate the c_a / c_l when given the shape.
If it can not fly with NiMH it is not a plane.
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