Lgel
Precisely when turning inverted.

Which stick do you use?

How do you transition from turning in normal flight to turning inverted?

Cheers.
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quorneng
If by turning you mean 'bank' the aileron stick works in the same sense as in normal flight, only the rudder and elevator are reversed.
So a 'bank and yank' turn becomes 'bank and push' when inverted.
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bogusbandit56
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Precisely when turning inverted.

Which stick do you use?

How do you transition from turning in normal flight to turning inverted?

Cheers.

If you have a nose heavy plane make sure you have a lot of down elevator.
I lost my Gotha due to this mistake, I didn`t have enough "Up"(down) elevon and it went in inverted.
Infact I`ve lost more than two planes like that.
In the past when I was loosing altitude inverted I would try to roll out but that can cause even more loss of height and a dirt nap. These days I try to make sure I have lots of movement on the elevator so I can loop out or climb safely.
Wot, no Depron?
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Lgel
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If you have a nose heavy plane make sure you have a lot of down elevator.
I lost my Gotha due to this mistake, I didn`t have enough "Up"(down) elevon and it went in inverted.
Infact I`ve lost more than two planes like that.
In the past when I was loosing altitude inverted I would try to roll out but that can cause even more loss of height and a dirt nap. These days I try to make sure I have lots of movement on the elevator so I can loop out or climb safely.

That is why I posted this question, I also rolled out of inverted with ailerons, and it was a slow and risky, even more when flying back toward slope.

I only began this year to train little more seriously aerobatics with my Vagabond XL, and I discovered recently (yes, I confess I am not very clever), that instead of rolling out by aileron stick it was much quicker to pull elevator when turning inverted. This way you don't loose speed (very important on a glider), and it is much faster.

Same applies when wanting to fly inverted, instead of flying straight and using ailerons, I now prefer to begin a normal turn, and then push elevator.

You obtain much faster and smoother transitions from normal to inverted.

Please try this four mistakes high and better with a sim before.

Cheers.
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Lgel
@bogusbandit56

If you roll out in the wrong direction when the plane comes toward you loose even more height, I trained this winter on a sim to eradicate this error I made instinctively when wanting to roll out.

Cheers.
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thunder
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@bogusbandit56

If you roll out in the wrong direction when the plane comes toward you loose even more height, I trained this winter on a sim to eradicate this error I made instinctively when wanting to roll out.

Cheers.

I don't fly planes that much so cant really offer any advice but just had to say,,flight sims are great for training yourself without the risk of breaking your model,i learned to fly rudder on a sim,and collective pitch helicopter training via the sim is priceless.
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OldSchoolFlyer
Inverted or upright coming toward you aileron is reversed THINK push the low wing up to level out or roll out. I usually push DOWN for UP when inverted just prior to roll out to give yourself some altitude for safety. Try some negative G split S to see how the plane behaves. Try hard down from level flight then roll out back to level flight. The plane may not like the Neg G half loop and roll out on its own. Give it a try on the sim
Old School Flyer
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Wildthing
Like anything the more you do it the better you get, all in training the brain.
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bogusbandit56
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@bogusbandit56

If you roll out in the wrong direction when the plane comes toward you loose even more height, I trained this winter on a sim to eradicate this error I made instinctively when wanting to roll out.

Cheers.

The problem with a roll out is you need to climb a bit and that also slows the glider and could cause the stall.
I must remember you have no power So the fast loop out would be best as long as you have enough height.
Wot, no Depron?
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OldSchoolFlyer
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Like anything the more you do it the better you get, all in training the brain.

Exactly Eventually you dont have to think, your fingers react in a reflex to what your eyes are seeing. It takes years of practice to respond to the plane without thinking. Speaking is not thinking, Just visualize a low pass at 70mph and you have forgotten about that back board and you shred a plane thru the chain link at 70mph and you have foam snow where ones was a nice park jet GREAT FUN THINKING
Old School Flyer
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Lgel
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Exactly Eventually you dont have to think, your fingers react in a reflex to what your eyes are seeing. It takes years of practice to respond to the plane without thinking. Speaking is not thinking, Just visualize a low pass at 70mph and you have forgotten about that back board and you shred a plane thru the chain link at 70mph and you have foam snow where ones was a nice park jet GREAT FUN THINKING

When flying on a slope I prefer to think twice before acting!
Cheers.
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whatmovesyou
The key to successful flying inverted back to regular or vice versa is to visualize in your mind what you NEED TO DO to be successful.

For inverted flight, the elevator needs to be in the upper half of the controls, ailerons go either left or right to level, and the rudder is REVERSE to straighted in out. You need to come up with a mental method to change instantly from inverted or regular flight.

Until you do, you will have "dumb thumbs" so when you do try it, go up 3 crash heights to practice. Use an old airplane so when you first get it, then you can try wind and then the final, doing turns.

It will come natural after that visual change is fixed in your mind.

I like to design and fly unique planes.
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DualDesertEagle
For me it depends of the plane's agility of the roll and pitch axes. If its more agile on the roll I give it a kick with the elevator and roll back over. If it's more agile on the pitch (for which it would have to be a very short plane with a big wingspan tho, or it would have to have a HUUUGE elevator) I do a half loop upwards. Or downwards if the altitude allows it.

I bet for most of the RCP Jets u don't even have to bring the nose up for rolling over, provided u've made the ailerons work.
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Lgel
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For me it depends of the plane's agility of the roll and pitch axes. If its more agile on the roll I give it a kick with the elevator and roll back over. If it's more agile on the pitch (for which it would have to be a very short plane with a big wingspan tho, or it would have to have a HUUUGE elevator) I do a half loop upwards. Or downwards if the altitude allows it.

I bet for most of the RCP Jets u don't even have to bring the nose up for rolling over, provided u've made the ailerons work.

You are spot on, my aerobatic gliders have a big wingspan 2m and a very short fuse 1 m, and enormous control surfaces.
Gliders are relatively slow on roll (a real life Fox rolls in 4s, and it is considered very fast), and more agile on pitch.

Cheers.
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DualDesertEagle
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Gliders are relatively slow on roll (a real life Fox rolls in 4s, and it is considered very fast), and more agile on pitch.


No need to tell me, I've been flying real gliders for a while. Loved the LS4 from the first moment after dropping the launch cable
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