JGrill
I am completely new to RC aircraft, having come over from helis. I just received my new Hawk Sky. To be nice, the directions leave a lot to be desired. How do I insert the brass rod guide into the horn. Do I screw it in, or should it slip through? The directions say to use the second hole, however, it shows them using the first hole. Also, where do the backing plates go, they do not seem to just snap on? Any help would be more than appreciated. Thanks,

Julian G.
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dtribby
The rod guide should slide through the hole on the horn. If it doesn't, you may need to widen the hole a little bit. The best tool for that is a drill bit the size of the post. An exacto blade can auger it out, but it may be a bit sloppy, as the hole will be beveled. You can also heat up another object just under the diameter of the guide post and slide it through to melt the hole bigger. If you use the post, the hole will melt and expand past a snug fit, and you'll get slop.

Which hole you use is personal preference. The innermost hole will give you the greatest control surface throw, the outermost the least. If you're using a computerized radio, you can use the closest hole on all of them and then dial the rates back on the radio - that way you can "grow" into the plane and won't have to reconfigure the rods. If using the stock radio, then I would use the innermost or middle hole on the ailerons and rudder, but the middle or outside one on the elevator. Mine was crazy on pitch, and that "helped" me crash my first few flights. It just depends on how daring you are, and how docile (or not) you want the plane to be.

If by "backing plates" you mean the small washer-like devices that clip onto the post of the rod guide, then they slip on. You may need some small pliers or a tiny nutdriver to push them on. Once on, they're not easy to get off, and we like it that way!

Welcome to the hobby, and the forum. Good luck!
Yes, I've known that I'm "different" for some time now...
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fishwhisperer83
Use the top horn because if you are just beginning you want less throw. Then eventually drill the other holes out for more maneuverability. And don't even worry about the back plated. They fall off and do nothing structure wise. Just hot glue the top part on and it will be fine. I pull over 3g's ( estimate) in some of my turns and the horn hasn't even budged.
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JGrill
Thanks guys, advice taken and appreciated.
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dtribby
Even as a beginner, I found having any surface but the elevator on the outer horn hole was mushy and pointless. At the low speeds at which the Hawk Sky can float around, having minimal throws got me INTO more trouble than not - well, it didn't allow me to get out of the trouble, anyway. Even at full throws and extended surfaces, the ailerons are sluggish at best. The elevator and rudder are the only "snappy" surfaces on this bird.
Yes, I've known that I'm "different" for some time now...
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flyboy10
If you dont have enough control surface as you would like, then you could add foam to the end. It will make it more controllable and if you dont like it, you could put dual rates on, or you can just take the foam off.
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flyboy10
You can always add extra foam to your control surfaces and if you dont like it, you can put dual rates on or just take it off.
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dtribby
Flyboy - the stock Hawk Sky radio has none of those features. You have to do your setup at the control surfaces.
Yes, I've known that I'm "different" for some time now...
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fishwhisperer83
Dtribby, the stock 2.4 radio does have a dual rate knob that decreases the throw of all of the surfaces the same. Unless you have modded the control horn for more throw, I wouldn't use the knob. My dad has enough trouble trying to correct for his mistakes with the added throw. Less would hurt him.
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flyboy10
Plus you could invest in a better radio (6 ch or higher) later on.
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dtribby
Yeah - the FM version doesn't have that. Took some time to find a pic of the 2.4ghz version and see what you're talking about. Problem is - you need ALL of the aileron ALL of the time just to keep that thing under control. Dialing back the rudder or elevator is do-able, but one knob for all - not unless your aileron rods are on the innermost hole.
Yes, I've known that I'm "different" for some time now...
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ashbreeze
One thing I noticed on my Hawk Sky is the backing plates for the control rods didn't connect all of the way and the nuts on the linkages kept getting lose so make sure you hot glue them on so you don't lose control in flight.
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ghostrider03z
If i were you, i would put the rudder at the hole closest in, and the elevator 2nd closest in on the horn. If i remember correctly, the ailerons already have the control rods all ready to go, right? Just leave the ailerons as they are but make sure they are on the inner most hole in the horn. The hawk sky ailerons, even as maneuverable as you can get them, are very slow and great for beginners. The elevator gives you pretty good authority on the hawk sky on the first hole, a little too much for a beginner so that is why i would put it on the second most inner hole. Just leave the little knob on the controller all the way to the right.
Crashing is part of learning. If you don't have any, it's like getting an F
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