OldSchoolFlyer
It appears from the plans that the rudder alignment is parallel to the fuselage. I expected to see the rudders angled in at the front to help high speed stability ? anyone have experience with this yet ??
Old School Flyer
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e3_Scott
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It appears from the plans that the rudder alignment is parallel to the fuselage. I expected to see the rudders angled in at the front to help high speed stability ? anyone have experience with this yet ??


In my experience from having experimented with it, "toeing in" vertical stabilizers that are angled to the wing plate like the F22, T50 and F18 has more negative effect than anything and caused even more instability in the back end. It is best to align them parallel to the fuselage on these planes. The "toeing in" works well on planes with vertical stabilizers that are perpendicular to the wing plate like Migs, Sus, F-15. The "toeing in" effect does help with high speed stability, but is also very helpful in yaw stability in turns and most of the rest of the speed envelope.

Planes with stabilizers like the F22, T50 and F18 are always going to be a little more unstable in the wind than Migs/Sus/F15s, etc, the angled stabs cause a characteristic "tail wag" in park jets in my experience.

You can experiment with them if you want, but once you start trying to angle them in relation to the fuselage, you are going to have issues getting the angle correct in relation to the wing plate. Just my experience from having tried it once on an F-22.

Cheers,

Scott
Park Jet noise...the "other" sound of freedom😎
#ParkJetnoise #ParkJetpilot
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OldSchoolFlyer
Thanks Scott Most of my experience is with the SU and F-15 I will take your advice and keep them straight for my F-22 build.
Old School Flyer
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Wildthing
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Thanks Scott Most of my experience is with the SU and F-15 I will take your advice and keep them straight for my F-22 build.

What Scott says is gospel unless Airflow is modifying it.
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