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F1wanabe
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I have mixed the carnards in 3 different ways on my Su Fullback. The same mix that I already use on my SU 37 Mk2, limited to upwards only. The canards does a great job when you want to fly slowly, with full control.

Airflow, what edge of the canards go up, front or back? On the su I mix them to go down, meaning that the front edge drops. This is the only way that the main wing does not get stalled. After watching many videos of the su and t50 this canards are only used th direct Airflow over the leading edge. On the mirage this is different since the canard is positioned differently.

youtube/gstrysky
frcfoamies
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squishy
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Thank you. Do you think I'll have any issues using a V-tail mixer instead the one on my DX5e. The throws on it are truly bad. I need to upgrade to digital DX6 or 7..


And this is why we tell people to buy the best TX you can when you are starting out...now you will have paid for two TX's, or more in the future and it adds up. It's better to just add it all up in the beginning and buy a really nice one..
"Education is not about filling buckets; it is lighting fires." W.B. Yeats

http://www.youtube.com/user/squishy654
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Airflow
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Airflow, what edge of the canards go up, front or back? On the su I mix them to go down, meaning that the front edge drops. This is the only way that the main wing does not get stalled. After watching many videos of the su and t50 this canards are only used th direct Airflow over the leading edge. On the mirage this is different since the canard is positioned differently.

youtube/gstrysky
frcfoamies

Yes you are right! Greg. The mix I now use on my SU is limited. Front edge down / back edge up, Always! in all three mix modes.
I have a small EDF jet, the Griffin/Gripen (Sky Angel model) with the same mix as my SU Mk2. but-- before I tried my griffin with full carnard movement, and then with the back edge pointing downward, the wing suddenly lost its lift capability. ..The plane crashed... this happened at low altitude. I was not fast enough to sort out the mistake.

But at higher altitudes, it worked just fine when the canards went the opposite direction towards the elevator. This gives the plane a very quick change in direction. Just like the real plane.
Some deltas using these carnardmovements to "kick" up the nose during take off.
Then, when the angle of attack is higher, the front edge drops, quickly! to direct the air over the wing to increase lift during the climb.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
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LukeWarm
Most real planes use the carnards to improve stability, they are computer and gyro controlled
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whatmovesyou
Canards are very dangerous, but if used properly, help the pilot.
As Luke mentioned, it improves stability, just like D Powers video did with his high alpha setup and gyro.

One way it helps, is assisting in the pitch axis. I fly a F-22 EDF with TV plus working canards. As the battery voltage goes down when doing high alpha's and slow flight, the upward thrust lessens and sometimes the nose will not go over and it just slogs along. Added canards, now problem is solved. It pitches the nose over(rather than a stall) and the EDF gathers speed to fly.

After a number of runs, I fly with TV and functioning canards at all times.
The key--set the angles properly-- mine is nose down 45 degrees with 50 % expo and 14 degrees nos up with 15% expo. This is mixed in with elevator travel.

The reason for high expo is when I put nose down for landing, very little canard is used. And yes, it took a number of crashes to get everything resolved.

The second way it is used is to improve the lift characteristics as you approach the stall angle. If properly located, on average, the stall angle is increased 10-15 degrees(Nasa's numbers) and the canard movement is small(+/- 5 degrees). Go watch a Grippen landing, that will show it is done. Oh yeah, they now use the canard as an airbrake!!

I have taken a F-22 and added canards to do testing with a prop setup. Notice as I said before, if properly located, it will increase the stall angle. What is the formula? Research shows:
canard shape, size, distance from wing, distance above/below/equal wing, wing shape/design,airspeed,deflection and many other factors control it. So change one factor slightly and there has to be a way before/after to show the results. It is like a shot in the dark.

One reason, not to much testing is being done by Nasa and companies is that they are designing's planes to reduce the radar signature and canards don't help.

So, if you are going to use them, be prepared for a lot of unexpected's.
I like to design and fly unique planes.
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Airflow
How the canards behave during takeoffs and landings can be seen on video from this year's Red Flag exercises - Nellis AFB. VG quality HD

takeoff - Landing



Takeoff
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
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whatmovesyou
This is the one I have bookmarked and using to model.
Watch the 3 pilots land, paying very close attention to small movements of the canards and watch the wing angle on landing.
The first pilot doesn't do very good, the second pilot is a lot better, and the third is an "ace" using the canards and higher angle to land which results in lower landing speeds by 10-20 kts.
I like to design and fly unique planes.
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Airflow
Yes you are right, but there's one factor we do not know about, the wind when this film was taken, if it was gusty, crosswinds etc.. It can affect how well (clean) the pilots manage to land.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
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vedo
iMy radio isn't digital that's my next step get a nice radio system...I did manage to set up the canards according to F1wanabe's instructions, many many thanks for that!
Took it today for maiden flight I had it powered with 2700kv motor, 50Amp ESC , 3 metal gear servos and 2200mAh battery. Although it was windy and the winds kept picking up I flew it and she's not all that bad handling the wind, the roll is quick but I was amazed how slow it can fly without stalling. I thought that 2700kv motor would be a overkill but I have no regrets . Thanks again for all the help guys if it wasn't for you I most likely would've left the field with bunch of depron pieces.
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F1wanabe
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iMy radio isn't digital that's my next step get a nice radio system...I did manage to set up the canards according to F1wanabe's instructions, many many thanks for that!
Took it today for maiden flight I had it powered with 2700kv motor, 50Amp ESC , 3 metal gear servos and 2200mAh battery. Although it was windy and the winds kept picking up I flew it and she's not all that bad handling the wind, the roll is quick but I was amazed how slow it can fly without stalling. I thought that 2700kv motor would be a overkill but I have no regrets . Thanks again for all the help guys if it wasn't for you I most likely would've left the field with bunch of depron pieces.

Great Vedo, the canard planes, when set up well, have a great combination of speed and slow flying ability. I really love how they loop and tumble as canards help plant the nose and the rear of the plane rotates around it. I'd love to see video!

youtube/gstrysky
frcfoamies
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vedo
Video should be coming soon I recently "infected" my friend with the hobby. I'll have him record it since a hand-held camcorder is all I have. I forgot to mention that I ran extensions for the ESC and I'm able to balance the airplane with 1300mAh/30c. The performance vs the 2200mAh(zippy compact) is not huge but very noticeable!
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whatmovesyou
Video didn't show up. This is the one


The "ace" is at 44 secs. Watch him drop, start working the canards, see the wing angle increase, speed back off and then touch ground.
I like to design and fly unique planes.
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Airflow
Yes, he held it in the air for a while before touchdown at lower speed.
http://www.youtube.com/user/AirflowFirst
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money..." Margaret Thatcher
"and always look on the bright side of life...o_O"
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