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FeWOlf
Wildthing wrote:
Well I did order that assorted package from Amazon and it is here but haven't tried it yet. 

Let me know how it goes, eye balling the same kit
Fly Like Hell, and you will get there!
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Wildthing
FeWOlf wrote:

Let me know how it goes, eye balling the same kit


Will do, 🙂
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solentlife
Could really be a great tool in the field if it works well .... 

I have a 12v soldering iron that surprisingly works well as long as you get out of the 'wind' ... but this may prove better.
I'll fly anything if I can launch it ! Youtube : solentlifeuk
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Wildthing
Well I tried it on a 18g wire, solder flowed through all the strands as far as I can see because I don't see any strands anywhere. When I slid the wires in a couple strands bent over and back over the insulation and even those are covered in solder. You can see the bent over wires in the first picture on the left side. Shrink wrapped nice and I can't pull it apart. so I would say they work. I guess it comes down to cost, definitely soldering and shrink wrapping the old fashioned way is cheaper but it also does take longer , this took 2 seconds to do and no mess. Of course don't throw out your soldering iron , still will need it for connectors and such. 

2019_1110_110726_001.jpg  2019_1110_110733_002.jpg 
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FeWOlf
for someone like myself, who has limit motion in my hand, this is worth the extra cost, especially since it will put my birds in the air.
Fly Like Hell, and you will get there!
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Wildthing
FeWOlf wrote:
for someone like myself, who has limit motion in my hand, this is worth the extra cost, especially since it will put my birds in the air.

It has it's place and definitely will be a great field repair as Nigel suggested. But a quick solid splice you are done in seconds.
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Wildthing
Well just used them for real to put a new hotend and thermostat onto the 3D printer, didn't feel like fishing the wires through the chain and they worked great and it is printing as we pseak . 

2019_1124_095741_001.jpg 
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DualDesertEagle
I've gotta say as someone who doesn't even have any crimping tools I solder everything I can, tho I've become an absolute crack at soldering during my apprenticeship as an electronics technician. In fact my soldering skills alone have earned me a job where I did tests of different kinds for them to see what I can and the guy looked at my solder joints and was like "No need to look at the rest, I want u on my team."

I try to avoid mid-wire soldering as much as I can, often replacing entire wire harnesses instead, but if I absolutely have to I slide heat shrink tubing over 1 of the wires and then, depending on the wire gauge, either hold both wires parallel to each other, twist the stripped strands together, solder them and bend the joint back over 1 of the wires while keeping it in line with the other, or simply push the stripped portions into each other while making sure that nothing bends and messes up the connection, before finally just flooding the whole thing with solder to make sure every little bit is connected. 

I honestly prefer soldering over crimping anyway most of the time coz I feel like soldering just gives me much stronger joints. And if the soldered ends were clean when u started they will stay clean and not corrode under the solder, whereas I've opened crimps (probably poorly executed ones tho) to find the copper corroded all the way through. 
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Wildthing
I've gotta say as someone who doesn't even have any crimping tools I solder everything I can, tho I've become an absolute crack at soldering during my apprenticeship as an electronics technician. In fact my soldering skills alone have earned me a job where I did tests of different kinds for them to see what I can and the guy looked at my solder joints and was like "No need to look at the rest, I want u on my team."

I try to avoid mid-wire soldering as much as I can, often replacing entire wire harnesses instead, but if I absolutely have to I slide heat shrink tubing over 1 of the wires and then, depending on the wire gauge, either hold both wires parallel to each other, twist the stripped strands together, solder them and bend the joint back over 1 of the wires while keeping it in line with the other, or simply push the stripped portions into each other while making sure that nothing bends and messes up the connection, before finally just flooding the whole thing with solder to make sure every little bit is connected. 

I honestly prefer soldering over crimping anyway most of the time coz I feel like soldering just gives me much stronger joints. And if the soldered ends were clean when u started they will stay clean and not corrode under the solder, whereas I've opened crimps (probably poorly executed ones tho) to find the copper corroded all the way through. 


Usually if I crimp something I will also solder it for my piece of mind. 
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FeWOlf
I use to weld for many years, but injury and age have are now a factor, and this has been a great help in getting back in the air, I don't have to ask my buddy anymore👍, ordering on Cyber Monday some crimping tools and crimps and this set and new radio
Fly Like Hell, and you will get there!
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