How To Measure A Propeller

Discussion in 'Scratchbuilding!' started by rchawk, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. rchawk

    rchawk Cadet

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    Does anyone know how to measure a propeller :confused:

    Thank You :)
    RCHAWK
    David
     
  2. DJRubberCow

    DJRubberCow Airman

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    tip to tip to measure the the length.
    Read the small numbers on the prop to see the the bite ^^
     
  3. Sonicjet

    Sonicjet Rookie

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    The first number is the diameter of the prop..the second number the pitch,this is a lab calculated value and is hard to explain,the prop measurement are normally printed on the front of a prop.
     
  4. kevinm

    kevinm Rookie

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    someone should invent a "tri square" calibrated for props, that when one arm was laid on the main driving face of a prop (and the prop would need to be screwed onto the device too at its mounting point ), would indicate the bite
     
  5. SCALLAN

    SCALLAN Cadet

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    Measure a propeller

    Props are pre-measured and the values are on the front side.

    First number is the diameter in inches
    Second number is the pitch in inches

    For example 6x4 APC

    One note regarding the pitch: at 100% efficiency, for the 6x4 example, the prop will pull the airplane forward 4 inches every rotation.
     
  6. rchawk

    rchawk Cadet

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    Thank You Everyone,
    I appreciate all the replys :)
    So correct me if I am wrong , for example a 5x5 propeller v/s a 6x4

    the 5x5 would make the ( same plane) plane go faster than the 6x4 , but the 6x4 would have more torque and be a better choice for a larger heavier plane :confused:
     
  7. RCPlattu

    RCPlattu Airman

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    Theoretically yes.
    Simply put larger props have more static thrust (= better acceleration) and smaller ones are for higher speeds. If you already have a motor, you have to pick the prop that suits it. If you can it's better to first pick the prop based on your needs (plane size, speed etc.) and then find a suitable motor. There are some rules of thumb for selecting the right power (wattage) and thrust range for each plane but I don't know them.
     
  8. kevinm

    kevinm Rookie

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    lol that would work too, reading the writing on the prop
     
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